Author Archives: lsubban

Call for Status-Only and Adjunct Lecturer Appointments

 The Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy are currently accepting applications for INITIAL AND RE-APPOINTMENT for Status-Only and Adjunct Appointments for the term beginning July 1, 2018. We invite you to apply.
 
The deadline for submitting your INITIAL application is JANUARY 15, 2018 and for RE-APPOINTMENT JANUARY 31, 2018. Please note that late applications will NOT be considered.
 
The academic goals of the Rehabilitation Sciences Sector cannot be met without the participation of talented individuals from many institutions and agencies outside of the university. The aim of Status-Only and Adjunct Appointments is to recognize the participation of highly qualified and dedicated researchers, practitioners and members of the community in the academic and clinical education components of the programs. These appointees augment the efforts and expertise of the full-time departmental faculty. We are seeking appointees who:
 
• maintain a high level of expertise and competence in their disciplines;
• are skilled at communicating expertise to members of their respective disciplines and the broader health care community;
• can stimulate, challenge and develop the scholarly and clinical capacity of students; and,
• contribute to the growth of the discipline by building the body of knowledge or advancing the quality, efficiency and effectiveness of practice.
 
If you are interested in applying, please visit our website, for Status-Only at http://aca.med.utoronto.ca/node/36; for Adjunct at http://aca.med.utoronto.ca/node/37 .
The deadline for submitting your INITIAL application is JANUARY 15, 2018 and for RE-APPOINTMENT JANUARY 31, 2018. Please note that late applications will NOT be considered.
 
Should you have any questions, please refer to the “2017-2018 Status-Only and Adjunct Sector Guidelines, also provided on the website or contact Annmarie Riley at the applicable email address listed below: Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, email: ot.statusappt@utoronto.ca

Special Lecture – Dr. Jennifer Fleming

 
Professor Fleming is Head of Occupational Therapy at The University of Queensland,
Australia.

 
Jennifer graduated from the University of Queensland in 1987 with a Bachelor
of Occupational Therapy with first class honours and a university medal. After working
clinically in brain injury rehabilitation for several years, she completed her PhD in 1996
as a Menzies scholar.
 

Her research aims to improve the lives of people with brain
impairment by understanding psychosocial and cognitive limitations arising from
neurological injury and discovering effective rehabilitation methods. Focus areas are
self-awareness impairment, memory rehabilitation, meaningful occupation and the
transition from hospital to home.

 
Her work is clinically based, interdisciplinary and
translational. It has been widely disseminated via more than 200 publications and
workshops and webinars for clinicians. Jennifer’s research has been funded by
competitive national grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council and
the Australian Research Council.
 
For more information, please contact: Debbie.Hebert@uhn.ca
 
Rehabilitation Sciences Building
500 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1V7
Tel: (416) 597-3422, ext. 3505

Rehab Rounds – Jeff Crukley – Thurs. June 1, 2017

 

Thursday, June 1st, 2017, 12:10 to 1:00 pm

Rehabilitation Sciences Building, 500 University Ave, Room 132

“Can cognitive capacity predict listening effort?”

Jeff Crukley, PhD.
Senior Research Scientist, Starkey Hearing Technologies;
Adjunct Lecturer, University of Toronto, Department of Speech-Language Pathology

Jeff Crukley is a Senior Research Scientist at Starkey Hearing Technologies. He earned his M.Sc. in audiology in 2007 and his Ph.D. in Hearing Science in 2011. Jeff completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Brain & Mind Institute at Western University and worked as a clinical audiologist in private practice. He engages in research on naturalistic approaches to understanding auditory ecology, and the relationships between hearing loss, cognition, and technological innovations. As adjunct faculty, Jeff enjoys mentoring students and teaching in the field of hearing science.

 

If you would like to attend by webconference, please log in as a guest at:
http://utrehab.adobeconnect.com/rehabrounds

For more information, please contact: rehab.sector@utoronto.ca
Rehabilitation Sciences Building
500 University Avenue, 1th Flr. Toronto, ON M5G 1V7
Tel: (416) 978-4648 Fax: (416) 946-8643 http://www.physicaltherapy.utoronto.ca/

Nominate an OT Mentor

Do you know an OT who would be a great mentor for the course Building Practice through Mentorship?  Each OT mentor works with a small group of students to build reflective practice skills and support professional development throughout the two years of the Occupational Therapy program.

Mentors are experienced OTs who are exemplary role models, have strong group facilitation skills, and must be nominated by colleagues or past students. Make a nomination by emailing the course coordinators (see below) with the name and email of the proposed mentor, and a short statement of why you think they would be a great mentor.

Please contact the Mentorship Course Coordinators for more information or to make a nomination:  Lynn Cockburn  and Anne Fourt.

Jade and Mallory Ryan

Dance Ability Movement Helps Fulfill Kids’ Dreams

The Ryan Sisters are truly inspirational! OS&OT Alumni, they have used their occupational therapy expertise and passion for dance to develop Dance Ability Movement which provides inclusive dance programs for all children.
 
 
It is the dream of many young children to learn to dance, and children’s dance classes are immensely popular. However, children with disabilities often face barriers to participation in dance. This is why the work that the Ryan Sisters do through The Dance Ability Movement is truly inspirational. They use their passion for dance and their skills and knowledge as occupational therapists to develop safe, inclusive dance classes for children of all abilities. The Ryan sisters and The Dance Ability Movement were recently profiled by CTV Toronto.

Mallory and Jade have danced all of their lives and both shared the dream that they could combine their enthusiasm for dance with their chosen careers in occupational therapy (OT). They recognized the limited opportunities for children with different abilities to participate in dance classes in their home community so they formed Dance Ability, a dance program tailored for children of all abilities. The first class commenced in 2010 at a local studio in Milton, Ontario with a team of volunteers providing 1:1 support and assistance for a small group of children with various needs. With growing demands and recognition of their services, Mallory and Jade officially launched their own business, The Dance Ability Movement, with the goal of “sharing the opportunity to dance with dancers of all abilities on a large scale and continuing to promote inclusivity and participation in the community for people with different needs”. The program is currently active in six host studios in the Greater Toronto Area, and more studios are being considered. The Ryan Sisters have no difficulty in recruiting volunteers, many of whom are dancers themselves who wish to share their love of dance with young aspiring dancers.

Aside from providing opportunities to participate in dance classes, The Dance Ability Movement offers summer programs to address various OT goals. For example, Set the Stage Camp combines a handwriting program with music and dance to assist pre-school and primary age children to develop their school readiness and specific motor skills. Art Expressions Camp provides participants a safe space to explore dance styles as well as other art forms and means of self-expression.

Mallory and Jade are currently pursuing various goals and future initiatives including the following:

  • Supporting schools in Toronto to include Dance Ability Movement dancers in their arts nights and talent shows, plus encouraging schools to offer more movement and dance opportunities for these students as part of their curriculum.
  • Exploring the role of dance as more than just a leisure occupation, but as a potential vocation for some of the dancers with disabilities who participate in The Dance Ability Movement programs who have the talent and passion to pursue dance further.
  • Providing more programming and support systems to keep youth with different needs engaged as active members in their communities.

They also feel honored to have been recently selected as “Agents of Change for Community Health” through the Centre for Social Innovation in Toronto, and are currently pursuing various goals and future initiatives including the following:

  • Aligning their model with existing OT models and theories to better advocate for community leisure programs and the importance of addressing the environment and societal perspectives to meet everyone’s needs

Mallory and Jade also maintain close ties with the MScOT program at University of Toronto by participating in various labs and delivering guest lectures to educate and inspire future generations of OTs. Through The Dance Ability Movement, Mallory and Jade are making important contributions towards creating community environments where inclusion of children with varying abilities is the norm. Their programs provide opportunities to enable children to express themselves through dance and other art forms, and to realize their potential.

Alumni Promoting OT & PT in Ukraine

Natalie Zaraska and Renata Roman, alumni of the Rehabilitation Sciences Sector at U of T, are working in the Ukraine to assist in the development of Masters level curriculum and to promote best practices in occupational and physical therapy.

Natalie Zaraska (nee Talya Kalymon)
BScOT’91

Natalie Zaraska is working hard to promote and help rehabilitation practice in Ukraine to evolve and grow. She explained that “as a member of the diaspora in Canada, I have always wanted to assist in development projects in Ukraine.” In addition to her BScOT from UofT, Natalie completed a Master’s of Rehabilitation Science from Queen’s in 1997. Natalie has worked in the area of mental health and acquired brain injury. She now works at Zaraska Rehabilitation, a private practice, providing community-based rehabilitation services to individuals with acquired brain injuries.

Natalie embodies a client centered approach and is passionate about the essential role OTs offer in the rehabilitation spectrum of care. Natalie is an ardent advocate, promoting, educating, and helping to develop the role of occupational therapy in rehabilitation in Ukraine. Natalie volunteers as an International Educational Coordinator for School of Rehabilitation Medicine at Ukrainian Catholic University (UCU) and is a founding member of the Ukrainian association of Occupational Therapy. Natalie also works with the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) to ensure Ukraine adopts recognized standards for education and the practice of occupational therapy.

Natalie believes U of T provided her with a strong academic background and inspired her to support high quality education programs in Ukraine. U of T helped Natalie become a leader and problem solver, and encouraged her to define and expand the role of occupational therapy in new areas.

Renata Roman
BScPT’84

Renata is a graduate of the U of T Physical Therapy program. She has worked in hospitals and clinics in Ontario and Quebec. She began her first private practice, Clarkson Sports & Physio, in Missisauga in 1991. Renata has been volunteering as a physiotherapist in sports medicine in Ukraine for 20 years and has worked with national teams and at the Winter Olympics. She has also given her time fundraising and advising the Children’s Rehab Centre in Lviv. The founder and president of the Ukrainian Catholic University asked Renata to help establish a western style rehabilitation program including physical and occupational therapy. This school was established within the university and she continues to sit on the Board of Governors.

Renata believes that U of T provided her with the education and tools to become an efficient problem solver when faced with a variety of complex patients. She is passionate about growing and evolving as a physiotherapist as well as helping countries with less established rehabilitation programs develop their professional standards and enhance their quality of care.

Advocacy & Innovation:

Renata and Natalie have combined their passion for rehabilitation to promote and enhance the role of physical and occupational therapy in Ukraine. Ukraine does not have the profession of occupational therapy, but Renata and Natalie believe in the integral role and value of OT to patients. Natalie is working alongside WFOT to promote OT to medical and government administrators.

Renata and Natalie are inspired to “raise the bar” for rehabilitation education and high quality patient care throughout Ukraine. They are assisting the Ukrainian Catholic University (UCU) to develop the curriculums for a Masters in PT and Masters in OT to be offered in September 2017. UCU is a forward thinking university working to exhibit the highest standards of education.

Renata and Natalie advise on the recruitment of potential rehabilitation students, and assist with the ongoing promotion of physical and occupational therapy. The UCU curriculum is being carefully developed with input from many international partners. Renata and Natalie have also created a working group of rehabilitation professionals in Toronto to provide consultation to UCU and future mentoring of students in the program. UCU hopes to stay closely connected to the faculty in the rehabilitation programs at U of T to support program development and implementation, and research initiatives for students and professors.

The classic pairing of physical and occupational therapy has proven once more to yield the best possible outcomes. Through their initiatives, Renata and Natalie are changing the rehabilitation landscape in Ukraine and Canada for students, practitioners, and patients.

Dr. Susan Rappolt: How To Go From Hospital To Home

Dr. Susan Rappolt is Chair of the University of Toronto’s Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. Doctors’ Notes is a column by members of the U of T Faculty of Medicine.

Leaving the hospital can be extremely complicated if you have had a serious health condition or injury.  Please read the full article from the  Toronto Star Touch – October 17, 2016 edition.